Python Script to Map Cell Tower Locations from an Android Device Report in Cellebrite

Recently Ed Michael showed me that Cellebrite now parses cell tower locations from several models of Android phones. He said that this information has been useful a few times but manually finding and mapping the cell tower locations by hand has been a pain in the butt. I figured that it should be easy enough to automate and Anaximander was born.

Anaximander consists of two python 2.7 scripts. One you only need to run once to dump the cell tower location information into a SQLite database and the second script you run each time to generate a Google Earth KML file with all of the cell tower locations on it. As an added bonus, the KML file also respects the timestamps in the file so modern versions of Google Earth will have a time slider bar across the top to let you create animated movies or only view results between a specific start and end time.

Step one is to acquire the cell tower location. For this we go to http://opencellid.org/ and sign up for a free API. Once we get the API key (instantly) we can download the latest repository of cell phone towers.

mappic

Currently the tower data is around 2.2 GB and contained in a CSV file. Once that file downloads you can unzip it to a directory and run the dbFill.py script from Anaximander. The short and simple script creates a SQLite database named “cellTowers.sqlite” and inserts all of the records into that database. The process should take 3-4 minutes and the resulting database will be around 2.6 GB.

Once the database is populated, the next time you dump an Android device with Cellebrite and it extracts the cell towers from the phone, you’ll be ready to generate a map.

From The “Cell Towers” section of your Cellebrite results, export the results in “XML”. Place that xml file and the Anaximander.py file in the same directory as your cellTowers.sqlite database and then run Anaximander.py –t <YourCellebriteExport.xml> . The script will start parsing through the XML file to extract cell towers and query the SQLite database for the location of the tower. Due to the size of the database the queries can take a second or two each so the script can take a while to run if the report contains a large number of towers.

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Ed was kind enough to provide two reports from different Android devices and both parsed with no issues. Once the script is finished it will let you know how many records it parsed and that it generated a KML file.

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This is what the end results look like.

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The script can be downloaded from: https://github.com/azmatt/Anaximander

This is the first version and there are several improvements to make but I wanted to get a working script out to the community to alleviate the need for examiners to map the towers one at a time. Special thanks again to Ed Michael for the idea for this (and one other) script as well as for providing test data to validate the script.

Follow my blog for up to date digital forensics news and tips: http://digitalforensicstips.com/

About Matt:

Matt performs technical duties for the U.S. government and is a Principal at Argelius Labs, where he performs security assessments and consulting work. Matt’s extensive experience with digital forensics includes conducting numerous examinations and testifying as an expert witness on multiple occasions.

A recognized expert in his field with a knack for communicating complicated technical issues to non-technical personnel, Matt routinely provides cyber security instruction to individuals from the Department of Defense, Department of Justice, Department of Homeland Security, Department of Interior, as well as other agencies, and has spoken frequently at information security conferences and meetings. Matt is a member of the SANS Advisory Board and holds 11 GIAC certifications. Among them: GREM, GCFA, GPEN, GCIH, GWAPT, GMOB and GCIA.

 

 

Access Historical WhatApp Conversations with UFED Cloud Analyzer

With UFED Cloud Analyzer 5.2, you can unfold suspect’s daily conversations by extracting WhatsApp backup from Android devices. While conversations are stored locally on the device, a WhatsApp user may backup their content to the cloud and later restore it on new devices, or when downloading the app again. Android device users can store the backup on Google Drive- the backup frequency (daily, weekly or monthly) is configured by the user.

You can access the information whatsappstored on Google Drive by utilizing login information from the Android mobile device. The login information contains two elements: the Google login information required to access Google Drive and a device key required to access the WhatsApp messages. If the Google login information has expired, you can use the credentials for the Google account, but to obtain the message you will also need the device key which is available in the account package generated by UFED Physical Analyzer. Without the device key, you can access the WhatsApp backup, however you
will only have access to media files (photos and videos) attached to the message, without the message itself.

whatsappeg

When can this become useful in your case?

  • When WhatsApp content isn’t available on the device- – a suspect or victim may be using a new device, and did not restore the data.
  • When WhatsApp data was deleted from the device.
  • When you don’t have access to the device.
  • Cloud backup may contain more info than in the device information.
  • When the user switches from an iPhone to Android, not all the content is smoothly transferred, since backups act different in iOS and in Android.

Register for a 30-day UFED Cloud Analyzer free trial, and explore how you can extract case-critical information that is only available in the cloud. forensicfocus_ufedcloudtrial_sept2016

TomTom Triplog Decryption: Provided by Cellebrite Advanced Investigative Services

Global Positioning Systems (GPS) fall into the category of wireless communications that hold a considerable amount of evidence that can be used in an investigation. People’s whereabouts are recorded in “second-by-second” detail on their TomTom navigation system and retrieving this type of information can provide powerful digital evidence for your case.

In recent years, the law enforcement community has seen a dramatic increase in the use of GPS devices as an instrument of a crime or as a “witness device” collecting and logging positional data while the crime is being carried out. TomTom and Garmin units are by far the most popular devices law enforcement have been encountering. The sales of portable navigation devices are at an all-time high.

Last year, more than forty million portable GPS devices like TomTom’s GO series or Garmin’s Nuvi series were sold worldwide.* In Europe, TomTom is the most widely used navigation system; and the big market share (47%) could be attributed to the TomTom built-in installation in vehicles. Forensic analysis of vehicle movements records can provide evidence of considerable value in crime detection. (While Cellebrite does not provide data extraction from built-in systems, we support decoding of chip-off data extractions from them, and then decryption of the triplogs).

Cellebrite supports a select list of TomTom devices, which can be found here. Aside from extracting timestamped GPS locations from the trip log files using unique decryption technology, Cellebrite also provides decoding support for contacts, calls and locations. Forensic analysis of such records can provide evidence of considerable value in crime detection.

Upon setting up a TomTom device for the first time, it prompts the user for permission to collect information from the navigation device. The information or triplogs shared is used to improve maps and other services offered by TomTom, such as traffic information related to where the user is. (These services are disabled if a user chooses not to share the information).

If the user accepts, his or her TomTom device is set to log all trips in dedicated binary files known as triplogs. These files are saved in the device file system under a directory named STATDATA. The triplogs collected illustrate a breadcrumb trail of where the person travelled to with the navigation system in very high resolution. TomTom triplogs are encrypted in order to protect user privacy, but also accumulate additional encryption obstacles to the ones that already exist.

Cellebrite offers a unique decryption service to our customers, as part of Cellebrite Advanced Investigative Services, that enables the extraction of timestamps and locations from the triplog files that reside in the STATDATA folder. The triplog files hold complete trip GPS information (including latitude and longitude), and thousands of locations, in a resolution of 1 to 5 seconds.

TomTom Triplogs

How can I send Cellebrite these triplogs?

Using UFED Physical Analyzer, open the extraction and then select Tools,TomTom menu, select Export to save the XML file generated from the triplogs, and submit to Cellebrite via CAIS. The decrypted data will be sent back to you within a few days, and ready to be imported into UFED Physical Analyzer- where the triplogs can be viewed in detail (3 second log when device was active). A kml-file can then be generated and viewed in Google Earth and other similar applications.

UFED Physical Analyzer enables TomTom extraction and decoding of the following information: home, favorites, recent, user entered, locations, last journey, location, date & time, routes, GPS fixes (also deleted), deleted locations (of all categories), as well as recovery of geotag visualization of location based data on Google Earth/Maps.

UFED Physical Analyzer has also been equipped with a covert feature that enables silent activation of triplog files, which means that you can connect a TomTom device to the UFED system and activate the logging feature. As soon as this is carried out, the device will start saving triplogs, once TomTom is in use again.

Send us an email to learn how Cellebrite Advanced Investigative Services can help with your encrypted triplog files, along with Google Earth KML files.

Watch the webinar below to learn how you can use UFED Physical Analyzer to extract TomTom files:

References

*http://www.forensicfocus.com/tomtom-gps-device-forensics

Introducing Cellebrite’s Advanced Digital Analytics Platform

Today we are excited to announce our new UFED Analytics solutions, a cornerstone of the Cellebrite Unified Digital Forensics Platform. Designed in collaboration with our customers, the new UFED Analytics Platform simplifies the complex by automating the manual, time-intensive tasks associated with analyzing and managing data collected from mobile devices, applications, cloud services and CDRs.

Comprised of three offerings, the solutions act as a force multiplier, empowering examiners, analysts, investigators and prosecutors to simultaneously organize, search, map, visualize and manage large sets of digital data to identify patterns and reveal connections between one or more subjects – or cases – quickly and efficiently. Advanced text, image, video, geolocation and link analysis capabilities deliver the deepest, most accurate insights possible, helping to accelerate investigations.

Cellebrite’s Analytics Product Family components include:

UFED Analytics Desktop: Designed to meet the needs of a single forensic practitioner or investigator, this application simplifies and automates analytical tasks, allowing a user to easily identify the critical relationships that can focus investigations.

UFED Analytics Workgroup: Designed for 50 users or less, UFED Analytics Workgroup delivers a client-server solution that efficiently and effectively manages hundreds of digital data sources.

UFED Analytics Enterprise: This scalable platform supports a complete, end-to-end digital forensics workflow, allowing anywhere from tens to hundreds of users to collaborate on a case or perform cross-case analysis simultaneously.

Expanding beyond the mobile landscape

The time has come for our customers to consider a more efficient approach in order to work cases faster. Sifting through data to search for evidence in PDF reports is like going fishing, and the more mobile devices, the more data, the bigger the report. Investigators can no longer waste their time with manual analytical processes. We now enable investigators to move beyond disparate data repositories and manual analytical processes to a unified investigative platform. With intuitive and streamlined digital forensic data management, case stakeholders can collaborate and act on digital data in real-time.

Read our case study to discover how the McLennan County District Attorney’s investigative process is already benefiting from this new approach.

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UFED 5.0 drastically decreases your time to evidence by drilling into the data that’s most crucial

Sifting through data is a very time consuming process- the average US smartphone user takes up 10.8GB of storage capacity on their device*, and taking into account different data recovery options in UFED Physical Analyzer, this process may take up to several hours to complete. UFED 5.0 came out with major time-savers that drastically decrease your investigation time, and lets you focus on the data that is most crucial to your investigation. Version 5.0 brings five crucial industry-first features, and support for 19,203 device profiles and 1,528 app versions.

Merge multiple extractions in a single unified report and avoid deduplicates

You asked for it, we developed it. With UFED Physical Analyzer 5.0, you now have the ability to merge multiple extractions from multiple devices into a single unified project, which can include logical, physical and file system extractions. The extracted data is presented under one project tree, and provides a unified extraction summary with device info per extraction, the ability to drill down to each extraction, and an indication of the original extraction source. If required, you also have the option to combine extractions from different devices. 

merge mult files

 

This powerful feature saves you time not only by combining the extractions, but also by removing deduplications (duplicate or redundant information), and grouping together similar and duplicate records for quick and efficient analysis. The following extraction types may be grouped together: Logical, advanced logical file system, physical, SIM card, JTAG, SD Card, and UFED Camera Evidence.

Here is what one investigator had to say about this new capability: “Being able to instantly navigate to where each piece of data is located in the memory dump is an outstanding feature. This saves hours of time on each complex investigation.”

Validate your data the right way

The latest validation process saves you time and resources by providing you with the most effective and most efficient way to perform a real and accurate validation process, by validating the decoded data with the original source file; Thus, reducing your need to use other mobile forensic tools for additional extractions to compare and validate the results.

Every recovered artifact has a source that it originally derived from, and can be used to later to validate the data. If previously you spent time manually searching for the original source, UFED Physical Analyzer 5.0 now tracks back the automatically decoded content to its source.

Every extracted record now includes the file source information in a table view or in the right pane with device information. Each link points to the offset data and includes the source file name, which can be included in a UFED report when testifying in court. For example, using UFED Physical Analyzer 5.0, an examiner can easily see from the original source file that a recovered SMS was a deleted artifact, since it was recovered from the memory of the device. That SMS is also visible and highlighted in the hex viewer, when clicking on the file source information link. (The db file where the SMS came from is also displayed in the right pane).

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Focus on relevant media files with the common image filter

An additional time saver added to version 5.0 is the new automatic filter feature. UFED Physical Analyzer 5.0 saves massive investigation time by automatically filtering out common or known images, allowing you focus on the images you need to get to the evidence quick, rather than wasting time reviewing thousands of images that are default device icons, or images that come as part of app installation.

The MD5 hash value is available for every extracted media file, and is visible in the user interface and in the report output, as part of the decoding process.

How would you use this feature? Say you have 200 hash values of indecent images in your own database, you can easily create a watch list for all the hash values from your database, and run the watchlist to find a match search for the same images on the device. In case of a match, a nude photo will be detected on the device. Alternatively, you can export the hash values from the device into excel, and run a match on your database, as well as expand your list with new hash values belonging to suspicious nude photos.

As presented in the image below, if previously you had to review 24998 images, you now have 900 less images to review.

ReviewMediaFiles_Hash_Calculation-Recovered

 

 

 

 

To view all images, click on filter reset or remove the auto-filter option in the Settings.

 

Access blocked application data with file system extraction

Version 5.0 introduces another industry-first capability, providing you access to blocked application data when physical extraction is not available for the specific device. The introduction of new app versions also introduce new challenges, such that they are no longer available for backup using the Android backup method, since they are blocked for backup service. UFED overcomes this limitation with a new option called APK downgrade method, also available via file system extraction. This method temporarily downgrades the app (or .apk file) to an earlier version that is compatible for Android backup. UFED will present the list of apps installed on the device, and the ones available for downgrade. Open the extraction in UFED Physical Analyzer to decode both intact and deleted apps data.

Popular supported apps include WhatsApp, Facebook, Facebook Messenger, Line, Telegram, Gmail, KIK and more.

Extract data using Temporary root (ADB) and enhanced bootloader method

Temporary root (ADB) solution has been enhanced to support 110 Android devices running OS 4.3 – 5.1.1, for file system and physical extraction methods, (when ADB is enabled). Logical extraction of apps data is also available for the listed devices using the temporary root solution. As part of your examination, you need to gain access to all the data stored on a mobile device.  This is achievable via a physical extraction, which is the most comprehensive solution, and provides the richest set of data. As part of our ongoing efforts, you are now able to perform a physical extraction for the selected 110 devices using the ADB method instead of manually rooting the device using an external tool.  Third party tools provide a permanent root, while Cellebrite’s temporary root solution is removed after restart, and assures forensically-sound extractions.

The bootloader method has been further enhanced in version 5.0. This unique lock bypass solution is now available for 27 additional devices (APQ8084 chipset), including Galaxy Note 4, Note Edge, and Note 4 Duos.

Version 5.0 also introduces physical extraction and decoding support for a new family of TomTom devices; as well as file system and logical extraction and decoding is also available for recently launched devices, including iPhone SE, Samsung Galaxy S7, and LG G5.

Watch the video below to learn more about UFED 5.0 release highlights.

Download our release notes for full details about version 5.0 capabilities.

Exclusive support for additional Motorola Androids highlights 4.5 release

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With the release of UFED 4.5, Cellebrite announces support for 18,290 device profiles and 1,270 app versions. The recent release brings industry first access to 11 additional Motorola Android devices, logical extraction via Bluetooth from any Android, and enhanced decoding support for the latest versions of all UFED supported applications running on iOS and Android devices.

Logical extraction via Bluetooth

Version 4.5 introduces a quicker and more efficient workflow, providing users with the option to perform a logical extraction via Bluetooth from any Android device. Extracting via Bluetooth is an effective solution to recover data from devices with damaged USB ports, as well as from prepaid devices (such as TracFone Android), which come with locked USB ports.

As illustrated in the image below, to use this option, select Use Bluetooth under Select Content Types.

UseBluetooth (1)

 

 

 

 

                                 Physical ADB method for rooted Android devices

Physical ADB method is now available for pre-rooted Android devices, when the physical extraction method is not supported. Using the ADB method, users can now perform physical extraction from rooted Android devices.                                                A few notes regarding rooted devices and ADB…

What is rooting? To “root” a device means to gain administrative rights on the file system on Android operated devices. A device can be rooted as part of recovery partition or fully rooted following rooting process.

What is ADB and how does it work? ADB, or Android Debugging Bridge, is a built-in protocol within the Android operating system. This protocol enables developers to connect to an Android-based device and perform low-level commands used for development. In UFED, the protocol to perform an extraction of Android Devices.

 Updated app support

Following recent news regarding ISIS terrorists using the Telegram app to carry out their activities, version 4.5 keeps pace with industry demands by providing enhanced decoding support for Telegram’s latest version running on iOS and Android devices. Updated support is also available for 134 Android and 43 iOS app versions.

Improved Functionality for UFED Physical Analyzer and UFED Logical Analyzer

Version 4.5 also introduces improvements for the ruggedized frontline tool, UFED InField Kiosk, enabling users to encrypt mobile forensic reports and UFDR files using a password. Users can open encrypted reports using the password, view the reports with UFED Physical Analyzer and UFED Logical Analyzer. Password-protected reports can also easily be shared with other other investigators over a network using UFED Reader.

Additional enhancements include new offline map packages for the following regions: Minsk, India, Germany, Australia and New Zealand, Scandinavia. (The Offline maps feature was introduced in version 4.2. This feature enables you to view extracted locations on a worldwide map without internet connection).

Learn more about UFED 4.5 – download the release notes here!

Save critical investigation time with UFED Reader: Q&A from Cellebrite’s webinar

In the past several years, cases involving computer hard drive forensics have declined while mobile forensics have risen, increasing demand to analyze digital evidence off mobile devices. Typically, the forensic lab examiner will generate reports with all the extracted data from the device and send it over to the investigator, who has to review all the data in order to find the relevant piece. This may mean sifting through hundreds, even thousands of pages from several devices in order to find the needle in the haystack.  In some cases, the investigator may discover that you need additional data that was not even supplied.

In a recent webinar, we presented the UFED Reader, a free and easy to use digital tool that helps you review the report files generated from analyzed data of a physical, file system, or logical extraction by UFED Physical Analyzer and UFED Logical Analyzer.

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The webinar is available for viewing at the bottom of this post. Meanwhile, participants asked a number of good questions, which we’ve compiled in this blog- including some that we didn’t have time to answer during the webinar.

Q: Can UFED Physical Analyzer create a .ufdr file that contains all the artifacts, including pictures, videos, SMS, MMS, etc.?

A: UFED Reader is able to create massive .ufdr files, even from phone dumps that are over 16 gig.

Q: Where is the UFED Reader file located?

A: UFED Reader executable file can either be forwarded from the forensics lab with a report, or it can easily be downloaded from the customer portal at my.cellebrite.com.

Q: Can I also see shared data between different reports using the reader?

A:  You can open different reports using the reader, it can be different reports of the same device or even reports related to different devices. However, each project is handled separately. You can perform searches on all projects but the views are separated. SMS’s, contacts, locations, all these are presented per project, also the timeline and reports are not shared. If you need to see connections and links, it is recommended to use UFED link Analysis; which enables you to open up to 100 data sources, and see the links between different data extractions.

Q: For multi-jurisdictional investigations how can you import an XRY file for parsing by a UFED?

A: While UFED Reader cannot open XRY reports, UFED Link Analysis has the ability to open external reports, and provides a joint view of both Cellebrite and XRY reports.

Q: Can you generate a report containing only bookmarked items?

A: Yes, UFED Reader provides you with an option to include entity ‘bookmarks only’ which incorporates bookmarked items only in the report output. Bookmarking highlights the evidence that is relevant to the case, and UFED Reader provides the option to include in the report only the artifacts that are important for that investigation. As a result, the report generated is concise, short and protects personal data that is not relevant to the case.

Q: Which mobile device operating systems are supported by the UFED Reader?

A: Cellebrite supports all known and familiar operation systems, and all devices that can be extracted and decoded using the UFED Series (including Touch/4PC/Logical/Physical) Analyzer) can be opened by the UFED Reader- meaning any .ufdr report generated can be opened by the UFED Reader.

Q: Are there chat-threading capabilities within the UFED Reader module?

A: In the Chats view, you will see a list of chat messages extracted from the device, including third-party app, such as Whatsapp or Snapchat messages. This view provides information about the chat, such as start date and time, participants, source and number of messages, which are also listed chronologically on the right pane in full detail (including body of messages and attachments). The conversation view layout option is also available for easier and better tracking over the communication between two or more parties. You can search for messages within a chat, select the messages to include within a report, print, or export the conversation.

Q: Is it possible to see restored deleted information from mobile devices?

A: Cellebrite has the ability to extract and decode deleted information from mobile devices, and these items are included in the.ufdr report, and presented in UFED Reader with a red ‘x’ icon next to the artifact.

Q: Can UFED extract logical and physical data from Windows Phone 8 and new Android-SM using MTP (media transfer protocol) instead of UMS (mass storage)?

A: For Windows Phone 8 using the logical extraction method, you can extract contacts via Bluetooth and Multimedia data via USB (MTP protocol). Physical extraction is available for selective Nokia Lumia (out of the box WP8) models. For Android devices, using logical extraction method, you can extract Multimedia data for newer Android devices, via USB (MTP protocol).

View the full webinar below:

 Leave a comment if you have a question that was not answered above, or in the webinar itself!

Exclusive bootloader method support for the latest Samsung devices headline UFED 4.4 release

Bootloader banner

With the release of UFED 4.4, Cellebrite announces support for 17,638 device profiles and 1,092 app versions. UFED 4.4 introduces the exclusive bootloader method designed to solve some of investigators’ most challenging problems for unlocking and extracting data from leading Samsung Android devices. Also including decoding support for new devices and OS updates, including iPhone 6S/6S Plus, iOS 9.1, and Android Marshmallow.

New unlocking & physical extraction support for Androids using the unique bootloader method

In previous version 4.2.6, we announced the release of the enhanced bootloader method, which enables you to obtain additional data when performing a physical extraction while bypassing user lock from Samsung devices.

As part of our ongoing efforts to provide the best physical extraction capabilities for the latest Android devices, version 4.4 introduces an enhanced bootloader to support newer phone firmware versions, and includes 12 additional Samsung devices. You can now obtain additional data by performing a physical extraction using the enhanced bootloader method for 85 popular Samsung Android devices running Android 5.x. This unique solution supports the following Samsung families: Galaxy S3, S4, S5, Note 3 and Note 4.

What is the bootloader method?

Physical extraction using the boot loader method is the recommended method to recover data from Android devices. When the device is in boot loader mode during extraction, the operating system does not run, and therefore, the device cannot connect to the mobile network. It bypasses any user lock is forensically sound.

New tutorial video is available below.

Cellebrite now supports new iPhone 6S/6S Plus and Android v6.0 Marshmallow

Recent device launches and updated operating system are also supported with UFED 4.4.  Users can now perform file system, logical (including applications data), advanced logical extraction, and decoding from,iPhone 6S and 6S Plus devices and iOS 9.1. UFED 4.4 also provides file system and extraction support for the latest Android v6.0 Marshmallow with limitations. Following recent changes made in Android 3rd party apps, including Facebook, WhatsApp and Snapchat, data from these apps can no longer be extracted when performing file system and logical extractions when using Android backup method. We recommend two options in order to overcome this limitation: Perform a physical extraction (when available), or root the device to extract data.

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Extend your investigation capabilities with enhanced support for new apps for iOS and Android

UFED 4.4 keeps pace with investigator demand for more app support, and greater visibility into app data. This version introduces newly added support for some of the most popular apps installed on both Android and iOS, including: Google Drive, Google Tasks, Google Translate, Inbox, One Drive ,Pinterest, Runtastic, Yandex Browser, Yandex Maps; One Note and VIPole are available for Android.

With 300 million active users using Dropbox, 250 million using Microsoft’s OneDrive, 240 million using Google Drive*, and 100 million users on Pinterest, (the third most popular social network in the US)**. We are bound to believe that high number of people using these apps on their devices, may also hold the evidence you need for your investigation.

Updated support is also available for 53 Android and 61 iOS app versions.

New decoding method process for WhatsApp data 

App_whatsappIn UFED 4.2.6, we introduced a new capability to decrypt WhatsApp data. Using a third-party script, you can manually extract the WhatsApp key (on non-rooted Android devices), and use it in UFED Physical Analyzer to decode and decrypt the data. During the process, the WhatsApp version will be temporary downgraded to an earlier version, so that the key can be .extracted and used to decode the WhatsApp database. The current WhatsApp version will be restored at the end .of the extraction process.

A new step-by-step process is now available in MyCellebrite.

Learn more about UFED 4.4– download the release notes here!

* http://expandedramblings.com/index.php/google-app-statistics/

**http://marketingland.com/pinterest-says-it-has-100-million-monthly-active-users-143077

Cellebrite launches first standalone UFED User Lock Code Recovery Tool for iOS and Androids

Locked devices have been a longstanding issue for mobile examiners since the evolution of smartphone devices. More than 50% of devices seized by police are locked.*

UFED User Lock Code Recovery Tool provides you with another solution to unlock the device and reveal the password on both iOS and Android operating systems, when no other extraction methods work. Using forensically sound brute force method, this standalone tool reveals the device’s user lock code on screen, and allows users to enter the password and access the evidence on the device, while ensuring that existing data remains intact.

How do I use this tool?

The tool is available for download for UFED users with an Ultimate license at MyCellebrite (the software runs as a standalone tool). Users are supplied with three Cellebrite cables to be connected to USB OTG mobile devices only. A UFED Camera or a Windows-based web camera is required to detect when the device is unlocked. For more information on using the tool, watch the video below to learn how bypass and reveal passwords on iOS and Android devices.

UFED User Lock Code Recovery Tool helps you get the evidence you need quick and at no extra cost.

*Consumer Report 2014